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DES Baby - Diethylstilboestrol

DES Baby - Diethylstilboestrol

Do you know if there has been any research to determine if babies of mothers given Diethylstilboestrol (DES Baby) are more likely to develop Osteoporosis? I am the only child, out of 100+ relatives of two generations that has been diagnosed with osteoporosis. I am also the only DES baby in the family. Thanks for looking into this.
I realize that if mom had not been given the drug, I would not have been a miscarriage or another stillborn. Just curious that is all.

A MyOsteoTeam Member said:

Try googling DES Babies. There are a lot of articles on research done into getting Osteoporosis if Mother had DES. Curcumin is recommended to take for Osteoporosis. You need to read these articles yourself to know if your cause of Osteoporosis is due to Mother having DES. Hope this maybe of some help but I’m going to incorporate Circcumin into my treatment for Osteoporosis along with vitaminD & calcium as it’s recommended for healthy bones.

posted about 1 month ago
A MyOsteoTeam Member said:

I do suffer from upper back and neck pain. Rounded shoulders started years ago.

I would love to know if treatment can reverse any of these symptoms…

posted about 1 month ago
A MyOsteoTeam Member said:

DES Baby: copy and pasted this article:

Diethylstilbestrol syndrome (DES syndrome) refers to developmental or health problems caused by exposure to DES before birth (in utero), such as reproductive tract differences, infertility, and an increased risk for certain cancers. DES is a synthetic form of the female hormone estrogen that was prescribed to pregnant women between about 1940 and 1971 to prevent miscarriage and premature labor. DES also may have been prescribed to women to inhibit lactation, as hormone replacement therapy for menopause symptoms, and as a post-coital emergency contraceptive (“morning-after pill”). It was first thought to be safe and effective, but studies later found that DES was not effective in preventing pregnancy complications and caused health problems in some children of mothers exposed during pregnancy, as well as some of the women exposed during pregnancy or for other reasons. It is important to note that not all people exposed to DES have health problems due to the exposure.

Females exposed to DES in utero may have reproductive tract differences affecting the uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix, and/or vagina. Examples include incomplete development of the uterus or cervix, a differently shaped uterus or cervix, and a transverse vaginal septum. These differences may increase the risk of infertility. Females exposed to DES in utero also are more likely to experience various pregnancy complications including ectopic pregnancy, miscarriage, and preterm birth. However, most have healthy babies. Additionally, females exposed in utero are at increased risk to develop cancers such as vaginal or cervical clear cell adenocarcinoma, squamous cervical cancer, and breast cancer.

Males exposed to DES in utero have not been studied as extensively as females, but may be at increased risk for epididymal cysts, undescended testes, and inflammation or infection of the testicles. Males exposed to DES do not appear to have an increased risk of infertility.

Of note, women exposed to DES after birth (those exposed while they were pregnant or those exposed for other reasons) have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. The children of women exposed to DES in utero (grandchildren of mothers exposed during pregnancy) may also have an increased risk for cancer, as well as higher infertility rates.

Treatment for health problems associated with DES exposure depends on each person's signs and symptoms. Women who took DES during pregnancy or for other reasons are encouraged to inform their doctors and children of the exposure, and children exposed in utero should inform their doctors so they can be monitored for possible health problems that may arise.]

posted about 1 month ago
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